The 208
Monday, October 26

Monday, October 26

October 26, 2020

After weeks of steady increases in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, Idaho Gov. Brad Little announced Idaho will move back to Stage 3 of Idaho Rebounds, the state's reopening plan. Though the state is taking one step back, modifications have been made to the restrictions placed on businesses and individuals. Today also brought the first court hearing in a case against West Ada School District parents and teachers from the West Ada Education Association. Parents claim the "sick-out" that took place last week was actually a strike, making it illegal under Idaho law. Plus, we'll take a look at early voter turnout from 2020 compared to 2016. With only eight days until the election, how many Idahoans have already cast their ballot?

Friday, Oct. 24

Friday, Oct. 24

October 24, 2020

A University of Idaho model projected Idaho's third wave and now the mathematician says the Gem State is at the tipping point between a downward trend in cases on the horizon or a continued spike going into the Winter season. A Ketchum woman is a new type of long hauler after dealing with the lingering health effects of COVID-19 for the last seven months.

Thursday, October 22

Thursday, October 22

October 22, 2020

Seven months after coronavirus hit Idaho, a Magic Valley lawmaker is now urging everyone to follow the advice of medical professionals. We asked her why she changed her tune. Also, the State Board of Education releases new COVID-19 guidelines. So does "red" now mean remote learning? The board's president explains. Plus, prepping for Boise State's home-opener; While there won't be fans in the stands, there will be cardboard stand-ins. How you can show your team spirit in absentia.

Wednesday, October 21

Wednesday, October 21

October 21, 2020

Carefully crafted or illegally organized? Is West Ada's teacher "sick-out" a strike - and therefore against the law, according to Idaho statute? That's the question a judge may soon decide. Also, there are less than two weeks to go until the November general election. But we likely won't know all of the winning candidates on that day. So how far will the pandemic push back results in Idaho? And in today's 208 Redial, welcome to Pete's Tavern in Nampa - home of pints, pool tables and the paranormal. 

Tuesday, October 20

Tuesday, October 20

October 20, 2020

Remote-learning relief. Idaho is dishing out cash to families in order to offset the costs of learning from the living room. But what about what's happening in the schools? Teachers now have an anonymous way to voice their concerns about safety protocol violations - and they've already had a lot. Also, COVID-19 numbers are surging in several parts of the state, including southern Idaho. To help slow the spread, healthcare leaders are pushing for all Idahoans to take personal responsibility.

Monday, October 19

Monday, October 19

October 19, 2020

Paving a path for education during the pandemic. Why medical experts are preaching personal responsibility as a major step in the return to normalcy. Also, with no football scheduled in the Kibbie Dome, the Idaho Vandals marching band is drumming up a solution. Why the band is bagging the brass and woodwinds for the upcoming season. Plus, it used to be a mecca for teachers in southern Idaho. Now it sits empty, but some say spirits continue to roam the halls. We dial back the clock and dig into the possibly paranormal patrons of Albion Normal School.

Friday, October 16

Friday, October 16

October 16, 2020

As Trump supporters organize a rally in Boise for Saturday, Oct. 16, city leaders are asking counter-protesters to not engage with any taunting or fighting. The West Ada School District is battling multiple fires at once, teaching during a global pandemic, Ada County going down to the red category of COVID-19 transmission, and a network that hasn't been through enough stress tests to go fully remote. After teachers forced the district to cancel all classes on Monday in response to a planned "sick-out" day, parents in the district are growing upset and frustrated with the board not sticking with its original playbook for being in the red category and so much more.

Thursday, October 15

Thursday, October 15

October 15, 2020

Hundreds of West Ada teachers are planning a mass sick-out on Monday after the district's board of trustees voted to continue with plans for a hybrid schedule, including in-person classes, despite the district being moved back into the red category, which indicates significant community spread of COVID-19. The president of the district's teachers union exlains why they're taking this drastic step. Also, Ada County has a new tool to help process a record number of ballots coming into the elections office. Why the $500,000 machine, nicknamed "Bessie," will save election workers a lot of time and effort. Plus, today's 208 Redial looks back at a story about a 102-year-old man who still plays golf every week.

Wednesday, October 14

Wednesday, October 14

October 14, 2020

The chairman of the state's largest school district - West Ada - abruptly resigned his leadership position at the end of Tuesday night's four-hour-long meeting. He said in a letter on Wednesday that he resigned due to the "unhealthy" level of distrust between the district and the board. But he wasn't the only local school board member to call it quits as the pandemic puts increasing pressure on decision-makers. Also, some Boise schools will close down and move students to virtual learning on election day, a move that election officials say will make in-person voting safer for everyone.  Plus, an eastern Idaho doctor has penned a strongly-worded op-ed as his county - Madison - continues to be a hot spot for COVID-19.

Tuesday, October 13

Tuesday, October 13

October 13, 2020

Back to red - Ada County's spiking COVID19 cases have sent its schools back a step. Red usually means stop, as in, stop what you're doing, but not so much this time. full-time...part-time...or no-time? No school district has had the public protests about their decisions quite like West Ada has and that hasn't changed, with this not-much-of-a-change designation. What does that mean for school sports? We've heard it a lot,  COVID-19 doesn't seem to have much of an effect on young people.  Well, that theory took a big hit today with an Idaho teenager sent to Utah in need of a heart transplant.

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