The 208
Monday, March 15

Monday, March 15

March 15, 2021

Despite the ongoing pandemic, Canyon County is expected to let its COVID-19 emergency declaration expire. But, some community leaders are asking, at what cost?

If you collected unemployment money last year, you may be getting a tax break on it - from the feds, not from Idaho. The Gem State is still stockpiling that surplus.

Some Idaho lawmakers are trying to make mask mandates nearly impossible - no matter what public health emergency we might be facing.

Friday, March 12

Friday, March 12

March 12, 2021

From bare shelves at the grocery store to the abrupt cancellation of sports tournaments (and pretty much everything else) to our very first confirmed case of COVID-19; it was an unprecedented, worrisome week this time last year.

With three vaccines now in production and making their way through the Gem State, Idahoans are beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel. After 12 months of living in "the new normal," what do Idaho's chief health experts believe the future holds?

From Sacagawea to Kristin Armstrong, women have shaped the cultural, political, and social landscapes of Idaho's history. To commemorate these trailblazing women, the Idaho State Museum's latest interactive exhibition honors dozens of women credited with creating and defining the history of the Gem State.

Thursday, March 11

Thursday, March 11

March 11, 2021

It's been a roller coaster ride for kids when it comes to being back in the classroom during the pandemic. Some are still not yet back full-time in person. And some parents say they have paid the price when it comes to trying to teach their kids at home. Now Idaho lawmakers want to actually pay them money for their kids not being in the classroom.

Remember when Boise State was just gonna try out this whole remote learning thing for just one day? One day turned into weeks and months. We take a look back at what the school was doing pre-COVID-19 and what they've done since.

The key to getting out of this pandemic is herd immunity. And that comes quicker with inoculations. We find out what it takes to get shots in arms, even in Idaho's backcountry.

Wednesday, March 10

Wednesday, March 10

March 10, 2021

Vaccinations are up, but unfortunately, so is a spike in COVID-19 variants in Boise's wastewater. Does that mean we could be headed for another surge in coronavirus cases?

The aftermath of the 2020 presidential election was full of false claims about widespread voter fraud. None of it was proven. But just to be on the safe side, Idaho is doubling down on voter security. Why nearly 18,000 people in Ada County will have to re-register if they want to vote in the next election.

Congress has now passed a $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill. It covers a wide scope, but one part of it is laser-focused on getting more money in families' bank accounts. We look at how it aims to help get 17,000 Idaho kids out of poverty.

Tuesday, March 9

Tuesday, March 9

March 9, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic is nearing a full year in Idaho and for some patients, their roads to recovery will likely be much longer. KTVB spoke with some coronavirus long haulers about what life is like with the effects of the virus. As more people get vaccinated than there are people who had it in Idaho, what are the chances of a "vaccine passport?" An Idaho state epidemiologist said it is highly unlikely that the state would need to create separate guidelines for people who have been vaccinated and those who aren't.

Friday, March 5

Friday, March 5

March 5, 2021

It wasn't that long ago that Idaho was dealing with a high demand and a limited supply of the COVID-19 vaccine. Now, however, it seems to have flipped: at least that's what one major hospital is saying.

Idaho lawmakers turned down millions of dollars to fund preschool programs this week, and the reasons why ran the gamut. We asked two early childhood educators to address those issues.

A sign that Spring is surely on the way: flocks of waterfowl working their way North and pit-stopping in Parma, of all places. But not for much longer.

Thursday, March 4

Thursday, March 4

March 4, 2021

The Idaho Senate passed legislation that would amend the state's constitution and allow the legislature to call itself into a special session. March 4 is Idaho Day, but with Idaho's state anniversary on July 3, why is today Idaho Day?

Wednesday, March 3

Wednesday, March 3

March 3, 2021

A proposed bill in the Idaho House is getting a lot of attention as lawmakers debate whether to accept $6 million in federal funds to increase the availability and accessibility of kindergarten in the Gem State. On Wednesday,  a Republican lawmaker apologized for his remarks a day earlier suggesting that he would vote against "any bill that makes it easier or more convenient for mothers to come out of the home and let others raise their child." This comes as a Democrat attempted to use House rules to his advantage by voting against the bill as a way to save it.

Also - Idaho Gov. Brad Little weighs in on the lawmakers' efforts to limit his emergency powers, and why he thinks President Biden's promise to deliver enough vaccines for everyone by May just doesn't add up.

Tuesday, March 2

Tuesday, March 2

March 2, 2021

For the first time since Idaho began receiving doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, we're getting a detailed look at who has received it, who is next in line to receive their shot, and where you can get in that line.

It's been nearly one year since Idaho kids were sent home from school and asked to learn remotely. That's one year away from friends and the familiar school routine, and one year spent at home. We hear from a parent and a pediatrician about how this may affect children.

Remember that episode of The Office where Michael Scott comes to Idaho? Well, it was this day more than two decades ago- long before his regional manager days- that he arrived. While we didn't know about Michael Scott, we did know about Elvis.

Monday, March 1

Monday, March 1

March 1, 2021

It's been a trend at the Idaho statehouse: Bills deemed questionable when it comes to their legality seem to make their way into law anyway. Now former Idaho attorneys general are banding together in an effort to protect the state's constitutions and taxpayer pocketbooks.

On this day 100 years ago, Idaho lawmakers passed a bill that, today, would be viewed as morally reprehensible, as well as unconstitutional. It doubled down on an existing law banning interracial marriage and stayed on the books for another 38 years.

They wanted nothing more than to keep their creative juices flowing. How a group of kids in McCall found a way to piece together an unprecedented performance during a pandemic.

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