The 208
Thursday, October 15

Thursday, October 15

October 15, 2020

Hundreds of West Ada teachers are planning a mass sick-out on Monday after the district's board of trustees voted to continue with plans for a hybrid schedule, including in-person classes, despite the district being moved back into the red category, which indicates significant community spread of COVID-19. The president of the district's teachers union exlains why they're taking this drastic step. Also, Ada County has a new tool to help process a record number of ballots coming into the elections office. Why the $500,000 machine, nicknamed "Bessie," will save election workers a lot of time and effort. Plus, today's 208 Redial looks back at a story about a 102-year-old man who still plays golf every week.

Wednesday, October 14

Wednesday, October 14

October 14, 2020

The chairman of the state's largest school district - West Ada - abruptly resigned his leadership position at the end of Tuesday night's four-hour-long meeting. He said in a letter on Wednesday that he resigned due to the "unhealthy" level of distrust between the district and the board. But he wasn't the only local school board member to call it quits as the pandemic puts increasing pressure on decision-makers. Also, some Boise schools will close down and move students to virtual learning on election day, a move that election officials say will make in-person voting safer for everyone.  Plus, an eastern Idaho doctor has penned a strongly-worded op-ed as his county - Madison - continues to be a hot spot for COVID-19.

Tuesday, October 13

Tuesday, October 13

October 13, 2020

Back to red - Ada County's spiking COVID19 cases have sent its schools back a step. Red usually means stop, as in, stop what you're doing, but not so much this time. full-time...part-time...or no-time? No school district has had the public protests about their decisions quite like West Ada has and that hasn't changed, with this not-much-of-a-change designation. What does that mean for school sports? We've heard it a lot,  COVID-19 doesn't seem to have much of an effect on young people.  Well, that theory took a big hit today with an Idaho teenager sent to Utah in need of a heart transplant.

Monday, October 12

Monday, October 12

October 13, 2020

Doctors are concerned about short-lived immunity when it comes to the coronavirus. A Twin Falls woman is currently hospitalized with her second bout of COVID-19. This time, she says, the symptoms are worse. Also, Day 1 of hearings for the vacant U.S. Supreme Court justice seat. But is the Senate moving too fast? We take a look at the history books. And, kicking butt and taking names. That's what one particular contraption does - sort of. We're revisiting an Idaho Life segment on National Kick Butt Day.

Friday, Oct. 9

Friday, Oct. 9

October 9, 2020

Earlier this week, The 208 reported on a mailer to residents in District 15 in Boise. On Friday, The 208 addresses how a simple mistake prevented us from telling the whole story and we make those corrections. In this 208 Redial, John Miller gets lost in a Canyon County corn maze all the way back in 2001. Friday is the deadline to register to vote online in Idaho, but voters can register at their polling location on Election Day and during early voting,

Thursday, October 8

Thursday, October 8

October 8, 2020

What does election security look like in the modern world? Well, there's some pretty advanced technology being installed so you can see exactly where you ballot is going, and who is handling it. Also, One More Day. That's what one local man is hoping to give veterans who are struggling to find themselves after returning home. Plus, the greatest gift you can lay at the feet of a guitar god - adulation by way of imitation. Hall of Famer Eddie Van Halen has now been honored by a Parma Middle School student.

Wednesday, October 7

Wednesday, October 7

October 7, 2020

As the November 3 general election nears, more and more political signs are popping up in yards throughout Idaho. But a new state law means you won't have to get approval from your HOA before showing your political support. Also, as coronavirus cases continue to surge throughout Idaho, a Magic Valley hospital is seeing record numbers of hospitalizations. A doctor at St. Luke's Magic Valley explains the uptick in people seeking treatment. Plus, Johns Hopkins University has released a report showing Idaho has the second-highest coronavirus positivity rate in the nation. But state health officials say the number is actually much lower. We looked into the discrepancy.

Tuesday, October 6

Tuesday, October 6

October 6, 2020

Four weeks from today, Americans will head to the polls for the November general election. With a huge amount of interest in this election, a lot of people are wondering what polling places will look like, especially since President Trump has encouraged supporters to show up at the polls to monitor for possible fraudulent activity. We looked into Idaho's rules for poll watchers and found out not just anyone can show up at a polling to place to observe the process. Also, a political mailer targeting state Sen. Fred Martin makes some salacious claims about the incumbent lawmaker. Martin's attorney says the claims on the mailer are defamatory and untrue.

Friday, October 2

Friday, October 2

October 6, 2020

We now have a clearer picture of how many polling places will be available in Canyon County for the Nov. 3 general election. But is it enough? We check in with the county's election officials to get their take. And, a historic theater in the town of Burley could soon become another victim of the COVID-19 pandemic. Plus, Idahoans tend to be pretty friendly folks; So friendly, in fact, that an eastern Idaho town makes it illegal to be anything but. We look into why Pocatello is considered the "Smile Capital of the U.S."

Thursday, October 1

Thursday, October 1

October 6, 2020

After the Trump administration recommended a new record-low cap on new refugees allowed into the country, the International Rescue Committee weighs in on the impact the decision will have on southern Idaho. And, Idaho will, once again, remain in Stage 4 of the state's reopening plan. While Idaho continues to struggle with new cases of the coronavirus, Gov. Little announced that the Department of Health and Welfare will start up a new vaccine advisory committee to help prioritize vaccine distribution in the state if and when one becomes available. But with Idaho having one of the lowest vaccination rates in the country, how effective would a COVID-19 vaccine be here? The governor addressed that question at his news conference on Thursday.

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