The 208
Friday, Sept. 11

Friday, Sept. 11

September 11, 2020

Parents and Republican lawmakers are urging the West Ada School District to reopen schools for in-person learning. Gov. Brad Little announces that he directing some federal COVID-19 funding towards the state's education budget. Plus, in this special 208 Redial, we go back to Sept. 14, 2001 when the Kuna Kavemen took the field for their first game after the 9/11 attacks.

Thursday, September 10

Thursday, September 10

September 10, 2020

You've got questions about the November election, and we've got answers -- from viewer concerns about the security of mail-in ballots to the deadlines for sending ballots back to the county clerk. And, the state's largest school district - West Ada - continues to experience technology-related issues as student attempt to learn from home.  Plus, one of Idaho's last remaining mom-and-pop camera shops has closed its doors for good.  So today's 208 Redial takes us back to 2004 for a look at when Idaho Camera was honored with one of the most prestigious awards in its class.

Wednesday, September 9

Wednesday, September 9

September 9, 2020

Eagle is now the second city in Idaho to be designated a "Second Amendment sanctuary city" after a unanimous vote by the City Council Tuesday night. But does the resolution actually have any teeth? Or perhaps a better question, is it even necessary in Idaho of all states? And, after Gov. Brad Little touted the state's much-higher-than-expected tax revenue in August, the Idaho Education Association is asking for a reversal of a mandated 5% budget cut to the state's education system. Plus, if you're planning to vote in person on Nov. 3, you may be wondering about how safe it will be, given the ongoing pandemic. We looked into the protocols to see how elections officials plan to keep voters and poll workers safe on election day. 

Tuesday, September 8

Tuesday, September 8

September 8, 2020

In the wake of the horrific abuse-related death of a 9-year-old Meridian boy a lot of people are asking, how could something like this happen? Jean Fisher, CEO of Faces of Hope Victim Center, says the new reality of the world - complete with months of working from home and quarantines has made finding cases of child abuse difficult. And, we break down what the change in color-coded categories for Ada County schools means for students at the state's two largest districts. Plus, today's 208 Redial takes a look back at the 30th anniversary of daredevil Evel Knievel's attempt to jump the Snake River canyon.

Monday, September 7

Monday, September 7

September 7, 2020

Labor Day. A day to celebrate the American worker but this Labor Day could make or break reopening plans for many schools, even bars in the area. A train heist.  A shoot out and martial law. Sounds like the making of an old western movie. But it's also what happened when Idaho experienced its most violent labor struggles. Brian Holms takes us back to that era of Idaho history. Some Idaho Legislators argue all of Idaho should be in the same time zone. They've even tried to make it law. So how did our great state end up in two different times?

Friday, Sept. 4

Friday, Sept. 4

September 4, 2020

We know it's a holiday weekend, but let's not get crazy. You saw what happened after Memorial Day and the Fourth of July. What health officials say we need to do to keep COVID case numbers from spiking again. This year's special session wasn't just weird, it was kind of costly. So who foots the bill for all that law enforcement overtime? Peanut butter and jelly, avocado and toast… bars and public schools? Yep, some Boise bar owners are now at the mercy of minors about when they can resume serving booze. 2020 is weird.

Thursday, September 3

Thursday, September 3

September 3, 2020

Idaho is staying in Stage 4 - once again - for at least another two weeks. Gov. Brad Little made the announcement Thursday morning, saying that, for the seventh time, the state has failed to meet the criteria to move out of the final state of the reopening plan. He cited the high number of people hospitalized as the main reason. And, why are some Idahoans who received unemployment benefits being asked to pay some of the money back? The Idaho Department of Labor explains. Plus, it was called a "titanic structure" by the local paper - christened with a bottle of cider by the wife of the man it is named after.  It was 93 years ago this week that the rim-to-rim bridge now known as the Perrine Bridge in Twin Falls first opened.

Wednesday, September 2

Wednesday, September 2

September 3, 2020

Gov. Brad Little has signed the second of two election-related bills passed during the Idaho Legislature's recent special session. With the new laws in place, the stage is set for the highly-anticipated upcoming general election in November. We take a look at what it will mean for Idaho voters. And, a Boise CPA explains President Trump's new payroll tax deferral program. While it will mean bigger paychecks over the next few months, there is a big catch. Plus, like so many events this summer, the annual Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic was canceled due to COVID-19. Our 208 Redial looks back at the event two years ago when reporter Joe Parris got to go on a memorable balloon ride high above Boise.

Tuesday, September 1

Tuesday, September 1

September 1, 2020

A big accusation from Idaho's western neighbors. Malheur County health officials claim Idaho's coronavirus policies are responsible for the eastern Oregon county's increase in coronavirus cases. And, we're taking a deep dive in the results of a recent West Ada School District parent survey. Plus, a new national park - in Idaho? Gov. Little has offered up the Gem State as a potential site to house a proposed monument to American heroes.

Monday, August 31

Monday, August 31

September 1, 2020

A new theory, triggered by data from the CDC, suggests that just 6% of deaths attributed to COVID-19 were actually caused by the virus. We talked with Dr. David Pate, a member of Idaho's coronavirus task force, about the new claims. And, hundreds of parents and students showed up at the West Ada School District offices Monday morning to protest plans to begin the school year online. But not all parents are in a hurry to send their kids back. Plus, the founder of Starlight Mountain Theater has died. We take a look at Ed Davis' impact on the Idaho arts community.

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