The 208
Wednesday, September 30

Wednesday, September 30

September 30, 2020

If you're voting absentee this November, you've probably heard the concerns about making your vote count. What could cause ballots to be bounced? We found out what trips up some voters in the process. Also, It's being called the worst presidential debate in the nation's history - and the national champion debaters should know. We talk with the Talking Broncos about Tuesday's presidential fiasco. Plus - spikes and waves. What's the difference when it comes to COVID-19? For the answer to that question, an Idaho historian provides context from the 1918 flu pandemic.

Tuesday, September 29

Tuesday, September 29

September 30, 2020

It's about to be one of the fastest Supreme Court confirmations in recent history - at least that's the plan. The process begins with one of Idaho's senators. We ask Sen. Mike Crapo about the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Also, all eyes are focused on the upcoming general election and who will be our next president. But there's another item on your ballot that could mean more - who will represent you in the Idaho Statehouse. And, as the countdown continues to Nov. 3, we answer more of your election questions - like how much it could cost you to vote, how to track your vote and where you might cast your vote.

Monday, September 28

Monday, September 28

September 28, 2020

As more students in Idaho's largest school district - West Ada - head back to the classroom, we're looking into a question from a viewer who is concerned about social distancing in schools. The district says they have a plan that includes putting students into so-called "pods." And, as the coronavirus pandemic continues, many high school students are deferring their post-secondary education plans. Plus, a local artist pays tribute to late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg - with a large, handmade chalk drawing outside of the Idaho Supreme Court.

Friday, September 25

Friday, September 25

September 28, 2020

Idaho is one of only three states to have a "crimes against nature" law that is still enforced. Now, one man is challenging the law after he was convicted of violating it - with his wife. And, college football will be back on the Blue this fall. Yes, it's a shortened season and that's about all that is for sure right now. Plus, back alleys usually carry a different connotation, but a Boise man is trying to turn his into a destination of inspiration.

Wednesday, September 23

Wednesday, September 23

September 24, 2020

With an open seat on the US Supreme Court, many questions are being raised about the future of landmark decisions from years past. With Republicans keen on confirming a conservative justice, cases like Roe v Wade could be overturned. If that were to happen, Idaho already has a road map in place. And, it's all Greek to me. As hurricane season picks up steam - and a new alphabet - we take a trip back in time to 2005 when that summer's brutal hurricanes caused headaches for Idaho drivers. Plus, before you dig into that next bag of Lays potato chips, take a closer look, because the man plastered on some bags is the founder of an Idaho nonprofit.

Tuesday, September 22

Tuesday, September 22

September 23, 2020

On National Voter Registration Day, we look at why you should take it more seriously than other "national days" - like National Ice Cream Cone Day, which also happens to be today. And, it's a riddle Idahoans have been trying to solve for more than 100 years: Why are some cities not located in the counties that bear their names? Plus, 14 years ago today, a tiny town in southwestern Idaho made national headlines for its proposal to crack down on crime. So, is every homeowner in Greenleaf required to own a firearm today?

Thursday, Sept. 17

Thursday, Sept. 17

September 18, 2020

Are masks really better than a vaccine to prevent getting COVID-19? KTVB spoke with an Idaho health expert about what the latest science says. Shutdowns were the biggest violation of rights since slavery? In this 208 Redial, we revisit an interview with a man who was born inside a Japanese internment camp during War Wold II.

Wednesday, September 16

Wednesday, September 16

September 16, 2020

More than six months after Idaho confirmed its first cases of COVID-19, there is hope that a vaccine is right around the corner. However, a member of Idaho's Coronavirus Task Force says the vaccine will not make life return to normal. We also take a look at Idaho Fish and Game's new mentoring program. The Maiden's Hunt teaches young Idahoans how to hunt and hunting safety. Also, would it be an episode of The 208 if we didn't discuss Ada County's high housing prices? We look at the average cost of living in the county and consider how minimum wage workers make ends meet. 

Tuesday, September 15

Tuesday, September 15

September 15, 2020

As summer comes to an end, Idahoans are heading out to the Gem State's recreation sites to soak up the final days. However, campers visiting Grimes Creek in Boise County have been leaving their sites covered in debris, leaving local residents to clean up after them. We also speak with Rep. Melissa Wintrow about the special legislative session held by Idaho lawmakers last month. She discusses how much money was spent on security during those three days. And, of course, we answer your election questions with less than two months before the presidential election.

Monday, September 14

Monday, September 14

September 14, 2020

Northwest Nazarene University announced Saturday that a series of saliva-based COVID-19 screenings have begun. These tests will allow students, staff and other faculty on campus to be screened regularly. We also discuss the Electoral College with Idaho's Chief Deputy Secretary of State. With Election Day less than two weeks away, how do Idaho's electoral processes differ from other states? A man by the name "Dugout Dick" made quite a name for himself in 1999, so we look back at a story done by former Idaho Life reporter John Miller.

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